To be or not to be?

“Internet activism seem trendy and shallow, if not harmful to traditional activist actions—like picketing, boycotts, and sit-ins. Hashtags and viral videos are nice, say skeptics, but people in power won’t move until they see boots on the ground.”

—That’s perfectly explain why online is chosen as an important field of activities.  It will bring some acute actions if left unguided, expecially for school students.

Acturally, online activities function are mostly limited to a beginning stage, the awareness.  If we want things to be solved, the official actions or fund support are the permanent solutions. I agree the artical Slacktivism is having a powerful real-world impact, new research shows  says, “a recent study published in the research journal PLOS ONE found that online engagement is key to turning a protest into a social movement and in prolonging its lifespan.” It need time for online activities become to real social action. It it secceed, it’s positive. But if it die away, it may be contribulate a little or it even turn things worse. Easy to orgnise, hard to win. That’s true. There are still a long way and a lot of challenges between designing online activism to real change. Wael Ghonim apologied for his predicting words but the good news was, he made reflections from failure.

to be or not to be

photo: http://baike.sogou.com/h7656749.htm?sp=Snext&sp=l12641461

To be or not to be? That is a question.

In my opinion, turn online into success results need more human efforts and explorements. But we still can’t ignore the awareness it gives to public. It’s a brainstorm or enlightment, as long as it’s not a internet bully or troll event.  Like every ideal activites, good things may turn out to be a disaster. There are distance between the origal meaning and the achievements. Online activism can’t fleed from it. But even if only one online activity achieved the goal, it proved the excistence meaning of online activism.

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Photo Credit: Earth Guardian Angel via Compfight cc

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